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How Do Crickets Get in the House?

Although crickets are not harmful, they can be annoying and disgusting. To begin with, one way to figure out how to deal with these pests is to answer why they’re in your house.

So why do I have crickets in my house? There are several reasons why crickets might enter your homes, such as being attracted to moisture, wetness, strong lights, clutter, woodpiles, and unkempt lawns. To reduce the cricket population or keep them out, take care of these issues around your property.

Read more details about why you have crickets in your home and what to do about it.

What are the different kinds of crickets?

Not only are crickets hard to find and get rid of, but their constant chirping at night can wreak havoc on your sleeping patterns and sense of calm.

There are several kinds of crickets that infest houses. Some of the most common ones are as follows:

1. Field crickets 

gailhampshire from Cradley, Malvern, U.K, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Field crickets are black or brown and are typically found in fields, meadows, and gardens. They range in size from about 1/2 to 1 inch in length. Field crickets eat a variety of plants and insects.

2. House crickets 

Kiloueka, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

House crickets are light yellow or brown and are typically found around homes and other buildings. They range in size from about 1/2 to 3/4 inch in length. House crickets eat a variety of plants and insects.

3. Camel crickets 

xpda, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Camel crickets are light brown or tan and are typically found in damp areas such as basements, cellars, and garages. They range in size from about 1/2 to 1 inch in length. Camel crickets eat a variety of plants and insects.

4. Cave crickets 

OregonCavesNPS, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Cave crickets are dark brown or black and are typically found in caves, tunnels, and other dark, damp places. They range in size from about 1/2 to 1 inch in length. Cave crickets eat a variety of plants and insects.

5. Mole crickets 

GFDL 1.2, Link

Mole crickets are brown or black and are typically found underground in burrows or tunnels. They range in size from about 1/2 to 1 inch in length. Mole crickets eat a variety of plants and insects.

6. Ground crickets 

xpda, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Ground crickets are brown or black and are typically found on the ground near water sources such as streams, ponds, and lakes. They range in size from about 1/4 to 3/8 inch in length. Ground crickets eat a variety of plants and insects.

7. Tree crickets

Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Tree cricket is green or brownish-green in color and is typically found on trees, shrubs, or bushes. They range in size from about 3/8 to 5/8 inches long. Tree cricket eats plant matter such as leaves, flowers, fruit, and sap

Crickets came to the US from Europe and can now be found in all states. They have a high concentration towards the east side of the Rocky Mountains.

Camel crickets and field crickets, in particular, are very common in the US. We will discuss these crickets in detail to find out how they can be eliminated.

How can I prevent a cricket infestation?

In my experience, it’s almost impossible to be “cricket-proof” since they’re so darn sneaky, but I do have some recommendations as to how you can best prevent crickets in your home:

1. Keep your home clean

Crickets are attracted to dirty homes and will come inside in search of food. Be sure to vacuum and regularly sweep to keep your home free of crumbs and other potential food sources.

2. Fix any cracks or holes in your walls or foundation

Crickets can squeeze through very small openings, so it’s important to seal up any cracks or holes in your home’s exterior. This will help to prevent them from getting inside.

3. Use caulk or weatherstripping to seal gaps around doors and windows

In addition to sealing up cracks and holes, you should also use caulk or weatherstripping to seal any gaps around doors and windows. This will help keep crickets out while saving energy by preventing drafts from coming into your home.

4. Keep your yard clean and free of debris

A tidy yard will not only be more aesthetically pleasing, but it will also be less attractive to crickets. Be sure to mow the lawn regularly and remove any piles of leaves, wood, or other debris that could provide a hiding place for crickets.

5. Use cricket traps

If you’re having a cricket problem that you can’t seem to solve, you may want to try using cricket traps. These devices lure crickets inside with a food source, then trap them so they can’t escape.

6. Hire a professional pest control company

If you’re still having trouble getting rid of crickets, you may need to call the professionals. A pest control company will be able to identify the source of your cricket problem and develop a customized plan to get rid of them for good.

Where do crickets like to hide inside your house?

Honestly – I’ve seen crickets in just about every place in a home you can think of at this point.

So the short answer is “everywhere,” but for the sake of this article, here are the most common places to find crickets in your home:

1. In your kitchen

Crickets are often attracted to the warmth and moisture of kitchens, so you may find them near your stove or sink. They may also be attracted to food sources, so check under your kitchen appliances and in pantries or cupboards for signs of crickets.

2. In your bathroom

Like kitchens, bathrooms are often warm and moist, making them an attractive places for crickets. You may find them near your toilet, shower, or sink. Watch for cricket droppings, which look like small black dots.

3. In your bedroom

Crickets may enter your bedroom in search of food or shelter. They may be attracted to your bedding or clothing, so check under your bed and in closets for signs of crickets.

4. In your living room

Your living room is another common place to find crickets. They may be attracted to the warmth of your fireplace or the light from your television. Check behind furniture and in corners for signs of cricket activity.

5. In your basement

Basements are often damp and dark, making them an attractive place for crickets. You may find them near water heaters, furnaces, or other heat sources. Check behind boxes and store items for signs of crickets.

6. In your attic

Attics are often damp and dark, like basements, making them another common place to find crickets. You may find them near vents or other openings that lead to the outside of your home. Keep an eye out for cricket droppings, which can help you identify infested areas.

7. Outside your home

Crickets typically only come inside homes for food or shelter, so you’re likely to find them near doors and windows. However, they can also be found in gardens, yards, and other outdoor areas

What are the signs of cricket infestation?

The most important sign of a cricket infestation is the sight of these bad boys, but here are the most common signs of a cricket infestation that I’ve seen:

1. You hear chirping

One of the most common signs of a cricket infestation is hearing chirping in your home. Crickets chirp by rubbing their wings together, and they do this to attract mates. You likely have an infestation if you hear chirping from inside your home.

2. You see them

Another common sign of a cricket infestation is seeing the insects themselves. Crickets are dark brown or black in color and have long antennae, typically between 1/2 and 1 inch in length. If you see one cricket, there’s a good chance there are much more hiding nearby.

3. You find droppings

Crickets also leave behind droppings, which can be another sign of an infestation. Cricket droppings are small and dark in color. If you find droppings in your home, there are likely crickets present.

4. You have damage to your home

Crickets can also cause damage to your home if they’re present in large numbers. They may chew on clothing, carpeting, or even walls if they’re present in high enough numbers. If you notice any damage to your home that you suspect may be caused by crickets, it’s important to contact a professional for assistance.

What do crickets eat?

Alpine Bush-cricket (Anonconotus alpinus) resting on fern

Crickets are omnivorous, meaning that they will eat just about anything. In the wild, they typically feed on plants and small insects.

However, they may also feed on clothing, carpeting, or even walls in your home. This can cause damage to your home if the infestation is left unchecked.

Here’s a summary of the most common foods for those wild crickets:

Plants

Crickets eat plants for a variety of reasons. First, plants are a good source of nutrition for crickets, providing protein, carbohydrates, and other essential nutrients that crickets need to survive.

Second, plants can help crickets regulate their body temperature. Cricket populations tend to increase in summer, and plants can help keep them cool.

Finally, plants can provide crickets with shelter from predators and the elements.

Crickets feed on various plants, including flowers, leaves, and stems. Some of the most common plants that crickets eat include:

  • Flowers: Crickets may feed on the petals or nectar of flowers. This can harm flowers, as cricket droppings can contain harmful bacteria.
  • Leaves: Crickets may eat the leaves of various plants, including vegetables and fruits, and they may also chew on the leaves of houseplants.
  • Stems: Crickets may feed on the stems of plants, including grasses and weeds.

Insects

Insects provide crickets with essential nutrients, including protein and carbohydrates. They also help to regulate the cricket’s body temperature, and can provide shelter from predators and the elements.

Crickets typically eat insects, including other small insects, spiders, and other crickets. They are omnivorous, meaning that they will eat just about anything.

And yes, crickets are insects themselves, and they are classified as Orthoptera, a large order of insects, including grasshoppers and katydids.

Clothing

One possible reason crickets may eat clothing is to get the nutrients in human sweat. Clothing can also provide crickets with shelter from the elements, and may chew on clothing for entertainment.

Crickets typically eat a variety of fabrics, including cotton, wool, and silk. They may also chew on synthetic fabrics, such as nylon or polyester.

Carpeting

Crickets eat carpeting because it contains a high level of cellulose, which is a nutrient that crickets need to survive. Carpeting also has a high moisture content, which crickets need to stay hydrated.

You typically see crickets eating carpet in areas with a lot of foot traffic, such as near doorways and entrances. Again, crickets are attracted to the moisture and cellulose in carpeting, and they will eat it if they can find it.

Walls

Crickets can eat walls because they have a strong mandible which allows them to chew through materials like wood, plaster and sheetrock. They usually eat the paint or wallpaper off the wall and then move on to the wood or plaster.

Crickets do not get any nutritional value from eating walls; they are only doing it because they are looking for a place to live or hide from predators.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs) about crickets

How long do crickets live in the house?

Crickets live around 8 to 10 weeks as soon as they reach adulthood, then pass away of old age. Cooling down temperatures later in the year will regularly kill mature crickets. Fully grown crickets can live without water or food for as many as two weeks.

Are crickets in your house? Good luck! 

For centuries, it’s been considered blessed to have a cricket on the hearth, particularly in Asian countries where crickets were formerly utilized as “watchdogs.” Native Americans also thought crickets attracted good fortune, and prevented mimicking the chirping from admiration for that insect.

Do crickets eat walls?

Yes, crickets can eat walls because they have a strong mandible that allows them to chew through materials like wood, plaster and sheetrock. They usually eat the paint or wallpaper off the wall and then move on to the wood or plaster.

How long do crickets live in the house?

Crickets live around 8 to 10 weeks as soon as they reach adulthood, then pass away of old age. Cooling down temperatures later in the year will regularly kill mature crickets. Fully grown crickets can live without water or food for as many as two weeks.