Skip to Content

How to Get Rid of Fleas in a Car

Fleas are a common problem for both pets and their owners.

If you have a pet, there’s a good chance you’ve had to deal with fleas at some point.

But what do you do if the fleas make their way into your car?

In this article, we will provide step-by-step instructions on how to get rid of fleas in a car.

We’ll also discuss why they might have landed there in the first place, and how to prevent them from coming back.

First, a personal story…

I remember the day vividly.

I had just finished an outdoor job taking my dog to work with me, and as soon as we got in the car he started scratching like crazy.

I looked down and saw that his fur was covered in fleas.

I also realized that they were probably all over my truck now too.

I had no idea how to get rid of them, so I did the only thing I could think of- I drove around for hours with the windows rolled down, trying to air it out.

It was a hot summer day, and by the time I was done, my car smelled like a combination of dog hair and Axe body spray.

Needless to say, I never made that mistake again!

How to get rid of all the fleas in your car

Look… there’s no other way to slice it.

Having adult fleas in your car (car seats, car doors, car flooring, etc.) SUCKS.

A LOT.

Here are the steps I’ve taken when getting rid of a flea infestation in someone’s car:

1. Vacuum the entire car, paying special attention to the seats and flooring

If you’re dealing with a flea infestation in your car, the first step is to vacuum the entire car from top to bottom.

his includes all the car seats, seat covers, seat belts, floor mats, and the car’s floors.

Don’t forget to empty the vacuum bag afterward, so the fleas don’t end up back in your car!

Once you’ve vacuumed, you can shampoo the car seats and floor mats and steam clean the car’s floors.

This should eliminate most of the fleas, but you may also want to treat your car with an insecticide to ensure they’re gone for good.

2. Wash all of the fabric surfaces in the car with hot water and detergent

The next step in getting fleas out of your car is to wash all of the fabric surfaces in the car with hot water and detergent.

This will kill fleas and their eggs, but it’s important to remember that fleas can also infest other surfaces in your car.

Vacuuming and shampooing the carpets will help to kill adult fleas, but you may also need to treat the upholstery and other areas with an insecticide.

If you have a flea infestation, it’s best to consult a professional pest control company to get rid of the fleas for good.

3. Sprinkle borax powder on all of the carpets and furniture, then vacuum it up

The third step in getting fleas out of your car is to sprinkle borax powder on all carpets and furniture, then vacuum it up.

This kills adult fleas and their eggs, but it won’t do anything to kill the fleas currently living inside your car.

If you have a flea problem, you’ll need to take additional steps to eliminate them.

However, sprinkling borax powder on your carpets and furniture is a good step in killing fleas.

4. Make a solution of vinegar and water, and spray it on all of the surfaces in the car

The fourth step in getting fleas out of your car is to make a solution of vinegar and water and spray it on all of the surfaces in the car.

This will kill adult fleas and their eggs, preventing them from reproducing and infesting your car again.

However, it’s important to note that this won’t solve the flea problem if you have pets.

If you have fleas in your car, your furry friends are the source of the infestation.

To get rid of fleas, you’ll need to address the problem at its source: your pet’s coat.

Luckily, there are several effective methods for killing fleas on pets, so you can get rid of fleas for good with a little effort.

5. Leave a dish of soapy water in a central location in your car for a few days (the fleas will jump in and drown)

Step five in getting fleas out of your car is to leave a dish of soapy water in a central location in your car for a few days.

The fleas will jump in and drown.

This method will kill fleas but won’t kill the flea eggs.

To prevent the eggs from hatching, you’ll need to vacuum them up and dispose of them.

Once you’ve vacuumed up all the flea dirt, your car should be flea-free!

6. [ONLY IF NECESSARY] Buy a flea bomb or fogger and use it to treat the inside of your car

I remember the first time I got fleas in my car.

I had just picked up my dog from the groomer, and when I put her in the backseat, I noticed her scratching furiously.

A quick inspection revealed that she wasn’t the only one with an itch – my car was infested with fleas!

I tried everything to get rid of them – flea spray, flea bombs, dead fleas, flea traps – but nothing worked.

Eventually, I had to accept that my car was a lost cause.

You may need to resort to extreme measures if you’re dealing with a severe infestation.

But before you buy a flea bomb or fogger, consider some less drastic options.

Flea bombs can be dangerous to both people and pets and may not be 100% effective.

There are safer, more natural ways to repel fleas, so it’s worth exploring those options first.

How do you get fleas in your car anyway?

The other day, I was taking my dog for a walk when I noticed something jumping around in the grass.

Upon closer inspection, I discovered that it was a flea.

I quickly walked away, but not before wondering how the flea had ended up in my yard.

After doing some research, I learned that there are a few different ways fleas can end up in your car.

For example, they can hitch a ride on your pet or on your clothing.

They can also jump through open windows or doors.

You could still have fleas even if you keep your car clean and free of pet hair.

So, next time you see a flea in your yard, don’t be too quick to judge.

They might have just been looking for a ride.

How can you prevent fleas from coming back into your car?

As I mentioned, I recently had the unhappy experience of finding fleas in my car.

After much research, I finally figured out how to eliminate them.

However, I soon realized that getting rid of the fleas was not enough.

I needed to find a way to prevent them from coming back!

Here are a few tips that have helped me keep my car flea-free:

  • Steam cleaning: This is an effective way to kill fleas and their eggs. Fleas thrive in warm, humid environments, so steam cleaning will help to make your car an unsuitable habitat for them.
  • Flea traps: You can make your own flea trap by placing a bowl of soapy water in your car. The fleas will be attracted to the water and will drown.
  • Baking soda: Baking soda can be used as a natural flea repellent. Simply sprinkle it on the seats and floors of your car.
  • Salt: Another effective way to repel fleas is to sprinkle salt around your car. Salt is a natural desiccant, so it will help remove the moisture fleas need to survive.
  • Boric acid: Boric acid is a potent insecticide used to kill fleas. However, it is also poisonous to humans, so use it cautiously.
  • Tick killer: You can also use tick killer products for dogs and cats. Simply spray the product around your car and on any carpets or upholstery.
  • Spraying novacide: Some people say to avoid spraying novacide, but I think it can be useful after weeks of repelling fleas with little luck. Just be sure to follow the directions on the label.

How long can fleas live in cars?

It’s every pet owner’s nightmare: you’re driving along, minding your own business, when you suddenly spot a flea crawling across the seat.

Or worse, you feel one biting your leg!

But how did the fleas get there, and how long can they survive in your car?

As it turns out, fleas are pretty resilient creatures.

They can survive for several months without food or water and withstand extreme temperatures.

So if a flea finds its way into your car, it could easily survive the journey – even if it’s a long road trip.

Of course, that’s not to say that you should just let the fleas have free rein in your vehicle.

Not only are they gross and annoying, but they can also carry diseases.

So if you do find yourself with some unwanted passengers, be sure to take steps to get rid of them as soon as possible.

Related questions

Can you flea bomb a car?

Yes, you can flea bomb a car, but it’s not the most effective method. Flea bombs kill adult fleas and won’t harm the eggs or larvae.

Additionally, flea bombs can be dangerous to humans and animals if used incorrectly. Follow the directions if you decide to use a flea bomb in your car.

What do fleas eat in a car?

Fleas usually eat blood but can survive for several months without food. In a car, they might feed on any small animals present, such as rodents or birds. They could also bite humans if given the chance.

Do fleas jump from person to person in a car?

Yes, fleas can jump from person to person in a car. They can also jump from animals to humans and vice versa. If you have fleas in your car, vacuum the seats and floors regularly to remove any eggs or larvae that might be present. You should also wash any fabric items, such as blankets or seat covers, in hot water to kill the fleas.

What do I do if I find a flea in my car?

If you spot a single flea in your car, there likely are more. You’ll need to vacuum the seats and floors and wash any fabric items in hot water to get rid of them. You might also want to use a flea bomb or fogger to kill any remaining fleas. Follow the directions carefully if you decide to use one of these products.

Can fleas stay alive in a car?

Yes, fleas can survive in a car for several months. They can withstand extreme temperatures and go without food or water for long periods. If you have fleas in your car, take steps to get rid of them as soon as possible.

How long does it take to get rid of fleas on a car?

It can take several weeks to get rid of fleas on a car. You’ll need to vacuum the seats and floors regularly and wash any fabric items in hot water. You might also want to use a flea bomb or fogger to kill any remaining fleas. Follow the directions carefully if you decide to use one of these products.

How long can fleas live in a car without a host?

Fleas can live for several months without a host. In a car, they might feed on any small animals present, such as rodents or birds. They could also bite humans if given the chance. If you have fleas in your car, take steps to get rid of them as soon as possible.